E THEME BY EXCOLO
Hi! this is my blog, my friends call me mccue, i'm 21, in VA currently, a dachshund lover and a recent college grad with a B.S in Psychology (wow so cool much impress) who would love to one day work for the fbi. im bisexual. As of late my fave shows/books include: Supernatural, Sherlock, Doctor who, Sleepy Hollow, TMI series, anything by Richelle mead, Hunger Games aaand the Divergent series is my newest find. I watch and read a lot more but those are my topsies. I sometimes post stuff about me but i think you can figure me out by what i reblog! Have a nice time <3
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marauders4evr:

As emotional as the Hobbit trailer was though, I love how it tried to be dramatic about who would die and who would survive.

Would Bilbo survive?

Would Legolas survive?

Would Gandalf survive?

It’s a mystery!

image

ladysilabee:

littleworldofmyown:

gifdistrict:

you called?

Drift kitten.

Fast and Furriest: Tokyo Drift

ladysilabee:

littleworldofmyown:

gifdistrict:

you called?

Drift kitten.

Fast and Furriest: Tokyo Drift

mihtrandir:

Ian McKellen ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

"I accept the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from George Takei and Luke Evans, and I challenge Laura Linney, Derek Jacobi and Anthony Hopkins! You Tube video here

sixpenceee:

problemedic:

plightofthevalkyries:

sixpenceee:

deucelooselyproductions:

sixpenceee:

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that psychiatrists cannot reliably tell the difference between people who are mentally stable and those who are mentally unstable.

8 mentally stable people were granted admission into 12 different hospitals. They all told the same story of how they would hear a voice inside their head, it was unclear but often said “empty”, “hollow” and “thud”. 

Right after they were admitted, the patients stopped showing any signs of abnormality. They took part in activities and talked to faculty and other patients as they would normally. 

None of the psychiatrists ever stopped to say “I think they are getting better” or “they seem absolutely fine now” In fact, nurses and psychiatrists took normal activity such as walking or writing and attempted to represent it as a form of pathological behavior. 

For example, staff would point to patients waiting outside the lunchroom as a form of oral-acquisitive syndrome, when really they were just bored and were anticipating their meal. 

It’s interesting to note that even though staff didn’t recognize that these people were completely fine, patients recognized that they didn’t seem to have any problems.

This study highlights how powerful labels can be.

SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

EVIL EXPERIMENT

Wow…this also potentially bespeaks how the people who are charged with making these patients better are only trying to create terminology and atmosphere that keep them institutionalized.
That’s pretty disturbing.

To anyone saying “well they said they heard voices obviously the doctors are going to look at them with a weary eye”

You missed the point.

They were supposed to detect the patients getting better and instead of being able to tell that, they took any action that the patients performed and totally distorted it and blew it to epic proportions to make them seem completely and utterly abnormal to a point where the patients were institutionalized for months. 

Also, sixpenceee, you missed the second part to this experiment - equally chilling, in my opinion. One hospital’s administration was angered by Rosenhan’s experiment, and challenged him to send impostor patients - mentally stable people masquerading as mentally unstable people - to their facilities. Their staff would then turn those pseudopatients away. Long story short, Rosenhan OK’d this part of the experiment. 193 people went to that hospital in that experiment period looking for help. They flagged 41 people as impostors and had doubts about another 42.

Rosenhan sent no one.

The staff of this hospital flagged impostor patients where none had existed.

That’s really worrying…

This is terrifying 

live-life-animated:

notthedisneyyourelookingfor:

thegapperproject:

wobblywibbly:

frozendailydose:

dosageofdisney:

I was not expecting that!

I don’t think anyone was expecting that!



IT GOT BETTER



This is now officially my most favorite thing on the internet

live-life-animated:

notthedisneyyourelookingfor:

thegapperproject:

wobblywibbly:

frozendailydose:

dosageofdisney:

I was not expecting that!

I don’t think anyone was expecting that!

IT GOT BETTER

This is now officially my most favorite thing on the internet

rainygalaxy18:

nothisisc8:

YOU KIDS THESE DAYS AND YER FANCY “SPRINTING” AND “MOTION CONTROLS”

WHEN I WAS YOUR AGE WE COULDN’T MAKE LINK RUN FASTER

NO, WE HAD TO ROLL ACROSS HYRULE FIELD TO MAKE IT TO KAKARIKO BY NIGHTFALL

BAREFOOT, IN THE SNOW, TAPPING THE A BUTTON REPEATEDLY FOR 10 MILES

AND WE WERE GRATEFUL

sclez:

sweetbuttandhellabooty:

can we just take a moment and think about the time my dad accidentally made a fried egg that looked exactly like africa

image

i’m the most impressed by the fact the egg also has madagascar

madeggascar

urulokid:

That… Is not what I expected

urulokid:

That… Is not what I expected

redbarracuda:

I decided to visit the Boston Public Gardens today, to see the bench from Good Will Hunting, so I could pay my respects to one of my idols. I wasn’t alone, as crowds of young and old stood near, bound together by sadness.

Rest in peace Robin.

ofgeography:

robin williams died today.
here is a list of things that robin williams was:
funny
sharp
kind
clever
and sad.
that’s important, the “and sad,” because sometimes sadness can feel like the only thing we are. it can feel all-encompassing. it can feel like the only thing anyone could possibly see, when they look at you: sad. that person is so, so, sad.
but there is always an “and.” we are never just sad. we are never only. we are always and.
we have all known people who were sad, who are sad; some of us are ourselves sad. being sad does not remove the other parts of us, though it can make them harder for us to see. when you are sad, you don’t necessarily feel like you are also funny, and sharp, and clever, and kind.
but you still are. you don’t have to feel like something to be it.
those things are written on your bones, they are woven into the fabric of your skin. sadness can feel so big, so big and overwhelming and complete, even when it is not a directed sadness. maybe especially when it is not a directed sadness, when it’s a depression that has no direct cause and nothing we can name.
sometimes the sadness is too big. people try to cut it out, or starve it out, or drink it down, or drug it silent. if this is you: i’m sorry. if this is you: you are not alone. if this is you: remember that the solution is never to give up, because you do not live in a vacuum. there are people waiting for you. there are films and songs and books and not-sadness waiting for you. i know that you don’t feel like waiting, but wait anyway.
if you need help, ask for it. here’s a link to crisis centers across the globe. if you live in the U.S., this is the national suicide prevention hotline: 1-800-273-8255.
robin williams died today, but the genie didn’t, and mrs. doubtfire didn’t, and peter pan didn’t. sean maquite didn’t, and professor philip brainard didn’t, and alan parrish didn’t. batty koda didn’t. john keating didn’t. you didn’t. 
don’t.

ofgeography:

robin williams died today.

here is a list of things that robin williams was:

  • funny
  • sharp
  • kind
  • clever
  • and sad.

that’s important, the “and sad,” because sometimes sadness can feel like the only thing we are. it can feel all-encompassing. it can feel like the only thing anyone could possibly see, when they look at you: sad. that person is so, so, sad.

but there is always an “and.” we are never just sad. we are never only. we are always and.

we have all known people who were sad, who are sad; some of us are ourselves sad. being sad does not remove the other parts of us, though it can make them harder for us to see. when you are sad, you don’t necessarily feel like you are also funny, and sharp, and clever, and kind.

but you still are. you don’t have to feel like something to be it.

those things are written on your bones, they are woven into the fabric of your skin. sadness can feel so big, so big and overwhelming and complete, even when it is not a directed sadness. maybe especially when it is not a directed sadness, when it’s a depression that has no direct cause and nothing we can name.

sometimes the sadness is too big. people try to cut it out, or starve it out, or drink it down, or drug it silent. if this is you: i’m sorry. if this is you: you are not alone. if this is you: remember that the solution is never to give up, because you do not live in a vacuum. there are people waiting for you. there are films and songs and books and not-sadness waiting for you. i know that you don’t feel like waiting, but wait anyway.

if you need help, ask for it. here’s a link to crisis centers across the globe. if you live in the U.S., this is the national suicide prevention hotline: 1-800-273-8255.

robin williams died today, but the genie didn’t, and mrs. doubtfire didn’t, and peter pan didn’t. sean maquite didn’t, and professor philip brainard didn’t, and alan parrish didn’t. batty koda didn’t. john keating didn’t. you didn’t. 

don’t.